Dine-out at Broders’ March 31st!

Mark your calendars for Monday, March 31st – you can enjoy a delicious meal and feel good about supporting the market, too!  All three of the Broders’ restaurants – Terzo ...

Become a vendor in 2014

We are currently accepting applications from new vendors for the 2014 outdoor market season (May 17th – October 25th).  For more information, please click here.  Applications are due February 28th, ...

Uproot Farm's oat and pea cover crops.

Uproot Farm

Sarah Woutat, owner of Uproot Farm, shared this photo of one of her oat and pea cover crops from last year.

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Last winter market this Saturday- March 22nd!

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Spring is just around the corner – and so’s our last winter market!  Find us at Bachman’s on Lyndale (6010 Lyndale Ave S) from 9 am – 2pm on Saturday, March 22nd, inside the greenhouse.  You’ll find a variety of local cheeses, meats, canned goods, prepared foods, breakfast / lunch items, and even some fresh produce!   Plus – live music, demos, activities for kids, and beer & wine by the glass.  It’s our last market before our Fulton and Kingfield markets open for the outdoor season on May 17th & 18th – don’t miss out!

Vendor list

Auntie Annie’s Fields: meats & eggs
Beez Kneez: clover, basswood, & buckwheat honey
Bodylish: bodycare products
Café Palmira: coffee beans
Chef Shack: street food
Davidson’s: honey & beeswax products, jams, jellies
Fazenda Boa Terra: produce
Gardens of Eagan: produce
Gai Gai Thai: Thai-inspired street food
Groveland Confections: chocolates and other confections
Havlicek’s Orchard: apples
Hazelwood Creek: pickled goods, jams
HeathGlen’s Kitchen: fruit beverage syrups, jams / jellies
ILO Bakery: Danish-inspired baked goods
Kiss My Cabbage: lacto-fermented sauerkraut & kimchi
LoveTree Farm: cow, goat and sheep’s milk cave-aged cheeses
Mi Casa: scarves & more
Mississippi Mushrooms: fresh mushrooms
Moonshine Coffee: fresh brewed coffee & coffee beans
Patisserie46: pastries, breads
Pottery for the Soul: functional pottery
Sassy Knitwear: cotton clothing for women and kids
Singing Hills Dairy: goat milk chevre & feta, yogurt, & pork
Star Thrower: sheep milk cheeses, lamb meat, yarn, pelts, wool blankets
Somi Tileworks: ceramic tiles
Sun Street Breads: pastries, breads, hot coffee
Sunrise Flour Mill: locally milled heritage wheat and other flours
Sunshine Harvest Farm: chicken, beef, pork, lamb, & eggs
The Moral Omnivore: street food
Walsh Ridge Farm: maple syrup, jams / jellies
Waxwing Farm: fresh greens, canned goods, soaps
Wise Acre Eatery’s Tangletown Farm: produce 

Music

9:00 am – 11:00 am Bob and Lynn Dixon
11:30 am- 1:30 pm Lingua Luna

Activities

10:00 – 11:00 a.m. - The Minnesota Farmers Market Cookbook: A Guide to Selecting and Preparing the Best Local Produce with Seasonal Recipes from Chefs and Farmers
Presentation and book signing with Tricia Cornell
Heritage Room, Bachman’s Garden Center
Presented by the Minnesota State Horticultural Society

Minneapolis author and local food writer Tricia Cornell provides time-tested kitchen shortcuts, tips on choosing each food in season, and plenty of advice on how to turn the fresh bounty of the farmers market into easy, delicious meals.  The Minnesota Farmers Market Cookbook not only lets you enjoy Minnesota’s unique, renowned farmers’ market culture, but helps you make the most of it in your home kitchen. Tricia Cornell contributes to the food blog “The Heavy Table”.

 The Minnesota Farmers Market Cookbook and Eat More Vegetables will be available for purchase.

10:00am – 12:00pm - Spark-Y 
Spark-Y will have interactive demonstrations of their sustainable education labs for kids.  Stop by to learn about aquaponics and vermicomposting through games and activities!

Drinks

Enjoy beer, wine, or hard cider by the glass while you shop, thanks to Bryant Lake Bowl.  Beer generously provided by Fulton Brewery.  

Parking

Parking is available on Lyndale Ave S and on 61st in addition to the Bachman’s lots.  
The MetroTransit 4L bus also stops directly in front of Bachman’s.  

Thank yous

We’re tremendously grateful for the support of our market sponsors – please support them as they support us! 

Lakewinds Food Co-op has been a leader in local and organic food for nearly 40 years, and has a long tradition of helping the families, farmers and neighborhoods that make up our community.  With current locations in Minnetonka and Chanhassen, Lakewinds is excited to open the doors to their new co-op in Richfield in June of 2014.

Rare Form Properties sprouted in 2006 as a low-overhead, nimble, modern brokerage geared toward what matters: personal service with a focus on urban neighborhoods, financial return, and an extensive support network.  Steve believes buying a home is a life changing event, and it should move along at your pace, whether you scour east Harriet for five years, or buy a duplex in Nokomis one impulsive afternoon.

Uptown Plumbing, Heating, & Cooling is searching for the oldest working furnace/boiler in the area. If your dinosaur of a heating system from the Jurassic period is the oldest furnace they unearth, they’ll replace it with a FREE energy efficient heating system.  

Stop by and say “hi” at the winter markets!  Thanks also to long-time market sponsors France 44 Wines & Spirits and Nicollet Ace Hardware in addition to Bryant Lake Bowl and Fulton Brewery.  

Winter market February 22nd!

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Beat the winter blues at our next winter market on Saturday, February 22nd!  We’ll be back at Bachman’s on Lyndale (6010 Lyndale Ave S) from 9 am – 2pm, inside the greenhouse.  You’ll find a variety of local cheeses, meats, canned goods, prepared foods, breakfast / lunch items, and even some fresh produce!   Plus – live music, demos, activities for kids, and beer & wine by the glass.  See you there! 

Vendor line-up

Auntie Annie’s Fields: meats & eggs
Birchberry Native Arts & Food: hand-harvested wild rice, crafts
Beez Kneez: clover, basswood, & buckwheat honey
Café Palmira: coffee beans
Fazenda Boa Terra: produce
Gardens of Eagan: produce
Gai Gai Thai: Thai-inspired street food
Groveland Confections: chocolates and other confections
Havlicek’s Orchard: Honeycrisp, Haralson& Keepsake apples
Hazelwood Creek: pickled goods, jams
HeathGlen’s Kitchen: fruit beverage syrups, jams / jellies
LoveTree Farm: cow, goat and sheep’s milk cave-aged cheeses
Mississippi Mushrooms: fresh mushrooms
Moonshine Coffee: coffee beans
Patisserie46: pastries, breads
Primitive Precision: metal jewelry and sculpture
Sift Gluten Free: baked goods
Singing Hills Dairy: goat milk chevre & feta, yogurt, & pork
Somi Tileworks: ceramic tiles
Squeaky Sailor Soap: handmade soaps
Squirrel!: dog treats
Sunrise Flour Mill: locally milled heritage wheat and other flours
Sunshine Harvest Farm: chicken, beef, pork, lamb, & eggs
Sun Street Breads: pastries, breads, hot coffee
Taco Taxi: Mexican street food
To the 9s: candles
Universal Pants:  hand dyed pants  & skirts
Walsh Ridge Farm: maple syrup, jams / jellies
Waxwing Farm: fresh greens, canned goods, soaps
Wild Run Salmon: wild-caught Alaskan salmon
Wise Acre Eatery’s Tangletown Farm: produce

Music

9:00 am – 11:00 am Mike in the Wilderness
11:30 am- 1:30 pm Kinda Kinky

Activities

10:00 – 11:00 a.m. - Minnesota’s Bounty
Presentation and book signing with Beth Dooley
Heritage Room, Bachman’s Garden Center
Presented by the Minnesota State Horticultural Society

Author Beth Dooley has covered the local food scene in the Northern Heartland for twenty-five years: she is the restaurant critic for Mpls.St.Paul Magazine, writes for the Taste section of the Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune, and appears regularly on KARE 11 (NBC) television in the Twin Cities. Minnesota’s Bounty is a user’s guide to shopping and cooking from your local farmers market, and it applies a practical, easy approach to creating a truly seasonal kitchen.  http://www.bethdooley.org/

Minnesota’s Bounty will be available for purchase.

10:00am – 12:00pm - Spark-Y 
Spark-Y will have interactive demonstrations of their sustainable education labs for kids.  Stop by to learn about aquaponics and vermicomposting through games and activities!

Drinks

Enjoy beer, wine, or hard cider by the glass while you shop, thanks to Bryant Lake Bowl.  Beer generously provided by Fulton Brewery.  

Parking

Parking is available on Lyndale Ave S and on 61st in addition to the Bachman’s lots.  
The MetroTransit 4L bus also stops directly in front of Bachman’s.  

Thank yous

We’re tremendously grateful for the support of our market sponsors – please support them as they support us! 

Lakewinds Food Co-op has been a leader in local and organic food for nearly 40 years, and has a long tradition of helping the families, farmers and neighborhoods that make up our community.  With current locations in Minnetonka and Chanhassen, Lakewinds is excited to open the doors to their new co-op in Richfield in June of 2014.

Uptown Plumbing, Heating, & Cooling is searching for the oldest working furnace/boiler in the area. If your dinosaur of a heating system from the Jurassic period is the oldest furnace they unearth, they’ll replace it with a FREE energy efficient heating system.  

Stop by and say “hi” at the winter markets!  Thanks also to long-time market sponsors France 44 Wines & Spirits and Nicollet Ace Hardware in addition to Bryant Lake Bowl and Fulton Brewery.  

Winter Markets: mark your calendars!

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Don’t miss out on our second season of indoor winter markets!  We’ll be at Bachman’s (6010 Lyndale Ave S) on the 4th Saturdays in January (25th), February (22nd) and March (22nd) from 9am – 2pm.  You’ll find locally grown & produced cheeses, meats, prepared foods, canned goods, crafts… even some fresh produce!   We’ll have over 30 of your favorite vendors from Fulton and Kingfield, plus some additional surprises.  We’ll also have beer and wine, live music, demos, and activities for kids. See you there!  

Find full details on the February market here.

Winter Markets:
Saturdays, 9am – 2pm
January 25th, February 22nd, March 22nd
at Bachman’s (6010 Lyndale Ave S)

Next winter market: January 25th

 

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We’re gearing up for our first winter market of 2014 on Saturday, January 25th!  We’ll be at Bachman’s on Lyndale (6010 Lyndale Ave S) from 9 am – 2pm, inside the greenhouse.  You’ll find a variety of local cheeses, meats, canned goods, prepared foods, breakfast / lunch items, and even some fresh produce!   Plus – live music, demos, activities for kids, and beer & wine by the glass.  Full details below.  See you there! 

Vendor line-up
Auntie Annie’s Fields: meats, eggs, & floral jellies
Birchberry Native Arts & Food: hand-harvested wild rice, crafts
Beez Kneez: clover, basswood, & buckwheat honey
BodyBliss: body care products
Bogart Loves: brioche donuts & other baked goods
Café Palmira: coffee beans
Chef Shack: street food
Fazenda Boa Terra: produce
Gardens of Eagan: produce
Gai Gai Thai: Thai-inspired street food
Groveland Confections: chocolates and other confections
Havlicek’s Orchard: apples
Hazelwood Creek: pickled goods, jams
HeathGlen’s Kitchen: fruit beverage syrups, jams / jellies
Kiss My Cabbage: lacto-fermented saurkraut & kimchi
LoveTree Farm: cow, goat and sheep’s milk cave-aged cheeses
Mary Dirty Face: canned goods
Meg’s Mittens: wool mittens and knit scarves
Mississippi Mushrooms: fresh mushrooms
Moonshine Coffee: fresh brewed coffee & coffee beans
Patisserie46: pastries, breads
Red Eye Ceramics: wheel-thrown pottery
ScarfShop: hand-dyed scarves
Singing Hills Dairy: goat milk chevre & feta, yogurt, & pork
Star Thrower Farm: sheep milk cheeses, lamb meat, yarn, pelts, wood blankets
Sun Street Breads: pastries, breads
Sunshine Harvest Farm: chicken, beef, pork, lamb, & eggs
Universal Pants:  hand dyed pants  & skirts
Uproot Farm: produce, whole wheat flour
Walsh Ridge Farm: maple syrup, jams / jellies
Wild Run Salmon: wild-caught Alaskan salmon
Wise Acre Eatery’s Tangletown Farm: produce

Music
9:00 – 11:00 Bob and Lynn Dixon 
11:30 – 1:30 Mike in the Wilderness  

Activities

Spark-Y Youth Action Labs
10:00am – 12pm
Bring the kids by to get a hands on feel for Spark-Y’s sustainable education labs! Spark-Y helps youth discover knowledge and empowerment by using programs focused on urban agriculture systems including: aquaponics, vermicomposting, algae cultivation, and mushroom cultivation.

Cold Weather Vegetable Seed Sowing
10:00 – 11:00 am
Heritage Room, Bachman’s Garden Center
Presented by the Minnesota State Horticultural Society

This year, why not try the mini-greenhouse, winter-sowing method to get a jump on spring vegetable planting? The soil in the mini-green house is warmer than in direct sown planting, and it’s easier than using grow lights. Find out how easy it is to start vegetables with this method and which vegetables do best.
Instructor Master Gardener Michelle Mero Riedel is a professional photographer and has published articles on many gardening topics in Northern Gardener magazine.

Drinks

Enjoy beer, wine, or hard cider by the glass while you shop, thanks to Bryant Lake Bowl.  Beer generously provided by Fulton Brewery.  

Parking

Parking is available on Lyndale Ave S and on 61st in addition to the Bachman’s lots.  
The MetroTransit 4L bus also stops directly in front of Bachman’s.  

Thank yous

We’re tremendously grateful for the support of market sponsors France 44 Wines & Spirits, Nicollet Ace Hardware, and Uptown Plumbing, Heating, & Cooling, in addition to Bryant Lake Bowl and Fulton Brewery.  Please support them as they support us! 

It’s the Holiday Market!

Our annual Holiday Market is coming up this Sunday, November 10th – and it’s going to be the biggest one yet!  We’ll be at Bachman’s on Lyndale from 9am – 2pm with lots of familiar faces from our outdoor Fulton & Kingfield Markets.  Expect a  vendor line-up packed with veggies, meats, cheeses, prepared food, winter-wear, and other goodies; see the full list of vendors below.  Enjoy music by Sister Species; we’ll also have beer and wine to enjoy by the glass thanks to support from Bryant Lake Bowl.  See you there!

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11/10 Holiday Market Market Line-Up

Auntie Annie’s Fields: chicken, pork, eggs, & floral jellies
Barn Swallow Garden: knitted woolen mittens, hats, bags & slippers 
The Beez Kneez: clover, basswood, & buckwheat honey
Bright Sun Candles: soy candles
Bodylish: bodycare products
Café Palmira: fresh-brewed coffee & coffee beans
Chef Shack: street food
Cherry Tree House Mushrooms: dried mushrooms, mushroom butter & pâté, mushroom log kits
Davidson’s Farm: winter squash, cole crops, root veggies, greens, dried beans, jams / jellies, black walnuts, apples, honey, & beeswax products
Gai Gai Thai: Thai-inspired street food
Gardens of Eagan: fresh veggies including greens & herbs
Groveland Confections: chocolates
Fazenda Boa Terra: root veggies & cole crops
Havlicek’s Veseli Vrsek Orchard: apple
Hazelwood Creek Farm: pickled goods, jams
HeathGlen’s Kitchen: chutneys, fruit beverage syrups, jams / jellies, sun-dried & smoked tomatoes, chipotles
ILO Bakery: Danish-inspired baked goods
LoveTree Farmstead: cow, goat, and sheep’s milk cave-aged cheeses
Mary Dirty Face Farm: apples, garlic, jams / jellies
Mississippi Mushrooms: fresh mushrooms
Moonshine Coffee: coffee beans
The Moral Omnivore: street food
Peter’s Pumpkins & Carmen’s Corn: winter squash and root veggies
Primitive Precision Metalcraft: metalcraft jewelry, sculpture, and cooking knives
Sassy Knitwear: cotton clothing, hats & scarves for women and kids 
ScarfShop: hand-dyed scarves 
Serves You Right: hand-crafted lazy susans and trivets
Sift: gluten-free baked goods
Singing Hills Goat Dairy: goat milk chevre & feta, yogurt, & pork
Star Thrower Farm: sheep-milk cheese, lamb meat, yarn, pelts, wool blankets & knit items
Sun Street Breads: pastries, loaf breads, cookies, & mini pies
Sunshine Harvest Farm: chicken, beef, pork, lamb, & eggs
Tiny Planet Produce: greens, root veggies, dried peppers & dried flowers
Uproot Farm: wheat berries, whole-wheat flour, root veggies, greens, cole crops, dried beans
Walsh Ridge Farm: maple syrup, honey, jams / jellies
Waxwing Farm: root veggies, greens, cole crops
Wild Run Salmon: wild-caught Alaskan salmon
WorkerB: skincare products featuring beeswax and honey

Market meals to close out the season!

by Becca Camacho

It’s the last week for the Fulton Farmers Market.  And it’s not too cold to come and enjoy the Fulton community, warm Moonshine coffee or hot apple cider.  The vendors are still selling a wide variety of produce and products.  For this last of the outdoor market season’s “Veggie of the Week” we have decided to highlight 3 Market Menus.  Many of us will miss Saturday mornings at the market so if you are one of these people, head there this Saturday and stock up.  Then spend a little bit of time in your kitchen making one one or all of the meals below, they are guaranteed to warm you this fall and winter! 

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Menu 1:  Grilled Garlic Lamb Brats, Vegetable Ratatouille, Skyr Whipped Potatoes

This meal is everything at once – rich and garlicky brats, vegetables that have been slow cooked so that their flavors are intensified and potatoes that satisfyingly serve as a base for each delicious bite.  When all the recipes are completed, layer your potatoes, then a scoop of ratatouille, and finally some sliced brats into your bowl.  While at the market pick up a baguette from Patisserie 46 to eat with leftover ratatouille.

Grilled Garlic Lamb Brats

Star Thrower Farm is selling these and they are truly as easy as simply throwing them on a medium high grill for 8-10 minutes, turning halfway through.  The weather is nice enough to do this, so take advantage!  If you feel you need to move your brats indoors you can either follow the same technique as grilling but do it under your broiler or you can brown them in a pan, then add a ½ cup of water, put a lid on it with just a small crack to let the steam out.  (I find that a piece of foil sometimes works best). Then, let them steam on medium low about 20 minutes until done, adding more water as necessary.

Vegetable Ratatouille

This recipe is adapted from MFK Fisher’s book Long Ago in France:  The Dijon Years.  It is simple to follow and results in a perfectly savory ratatouille.

Serves 10-12 heaping portions (freezes well)

2 large eggplants, cubed
2 yellow onions, sliced
4 garlic cloves, minced
2 medium green pepper, diced
2 medium red pepper, diced
4-5 medium tomatoes, peeled and sliced into wedges
(Fisher says to peel the tomatoes but we think it’s okay to be lazy and leave unpeeled)
Good olive oil

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.  Place all the vegetables into a dutch oven in any order you’d like except the tomatoes which should be placed on top.  Generously pour olive oil over the top, maybe 3 circles.  Cover the vegetables with a lid and place into the oven for 5-6 hours, stirring every hour or so until it is no longer soupy and is cooked down and full with flavor.  

The recipe in Fisher’s words can be found here:  http://scarletlillies.wordpress.com/2008/07/25/fisher-on-ratatouille/

Skyr Whipped Potatoes
by Becca Camacho
10 servings

3 pounds Yukon gold potatoes
1 ⅓ cups Singing Hills Dairy skyr (goat’s milk yogurt)
1 ½ cups vegetable or chicken broth
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
3 sliced scallions (optional)

Peel potatoes and cut into cubes.  Place them in a large pot and cover them with water and sprinkle generously with salt.  Bring to a boil, then lower just a bit and cook until fork tender.

Drain the potatoes and put them back on the heat and shake the pot a little until all the water in the bottom of the pot has been absorbed.  This dries the potatoes and improves the texture.

To the pot add the skyr, 1 cup of the broth, a tsp of salt and a few grinds of pepper.  Then, using a handheld mixer, beat the potatoes until the skyr and broth have been combined and the potatoes are no longer lumpy.  If necessary, add the rest of the broth.  Taste and correct the seasonings.  If you are an onion fan, fold the onions into the potatoes.

Menu 2:  West African Peanut Soup, Whole Wheat Naan

This kid-friendly, body warming meal will light up your kitchen on a weeknight.  Packed full of protein and veggies, it delivers a lot of nutrients along with high flavor.  Uproot Farm is selling whole wheat flour right now, so grab some and try your hand at homemade naan.  It’s easier than it looks.  Drizzle with the Beez Kneez honey you bought earlier this year at the market to sweeten up your naan.  

West African Peanut Soup
from Common Threads Cookbook
4-6 servings

1 c chopped onions
½ tbs peanut or vegetable oil
¼ tsp cayenne pepper or other ground dried chiles (amount is to taste)
½ tsp grated or minced peeled fresh ginger root
1 cup finely diced sweet potatoes
2 cups vegetable broth or water
½ cup tomato juice
½ cup smooth peanut butter
½ cup chopped scallions
salt and pepper – a dash each

Cut the onions, peel and mince the ginger, peel and chop the carrots, and dice the sweet potatoes.

Saute the onions in the oil in a medium pot until they start to look clear.  Stir in the cayenne and fresh ginger.  Add the carrots and saute for 2-3 more minutes.  Add the potatoes and broth, bring the soup to a boil, and then simmer for about 15 minutes, until the vegetables are tender.

When the vegetables are tender, take the pot off the heat and let it cool slightly.  Then, pour the soup slowly into a blender or food processor.  Puree the soup so the vegetables are smooth.  If you have an immersion blender, you may want to use it instead.

Add the peanut butter and blend again, scraping down the sides of the blender as needed to make sure everything is mixed well.  Taste the soup.  Its sweetness will depend upon the sweetness of the carrots and sweet potatoes.  Add the salt and pepper.  Serve and top with scallions.

Whole Wheat Naan

This recipe is from King Arthur’s flour but Uproot Farm has flour for you this Saturday!  The recipe is at the bottom of this link.  Make it a very kid-friendly meal and involve your kids in the kneading and hand-stretching.  http://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2013/07/31/whole-wheat-naan-with-raita-grill-friends/

***As an added bonus, make extra naan and re-heat it in the oven with Singing Hills Dairy’s

curry feta or paprika feta spread on top.

 

Meal 3 Seared Salmon with Citrus-Soy Glaze and Spicy Miso Soup with Vegetables

This meal is absolutely packed with some of our favorite market veggies.  The salmon, which is very simple to prepare, lays on a bed of cabbage, peppers, carrots and spinach.  The soup is spicy and nourishing.  

You can find the salmon recipe here:  http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/drink/views/Seared-Salmon-with-Citrus-Soy-Glaze-103615

Spicy Miso Soup with Vegetables
by Becca Camacho
Serves 4

1 head of broccoli florets
½ medium sized carrot, cut into skinny planks
1 small shallot, sliced thinly
1 small bok choy, stalks cut into thumb sized pieces and the large leaves cut in half
3 garlic cloves, sliced thinly
3 tablespoons freshly grated ginger
8 cups of vegetable broth
5 tablespoons of white miso paste
1 tablespoon sriracha or to taste

Bring a pot of salted water to boil and quickly blanch the broccoli through the bok choy.  To blanch, you lower the vegetables in the water quickly and leave them for about 20 seconds.  Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside.

Drain the liquid from the pot and add the garlic, ginger and broth.  Bring to a boil and simmer for 5 minutes.  Ladle a cup of broth into a separate bowl then whisk in the miso paste until you’ve created a slurry.  Add that mixture into the pot and let it heat through.  Add in the sriracha (a little at a time) until it it to the level of heat that you like.

Divide the vegetables between 4 large bowls and add the broth.  Enjoy!

Veggie of the Week: Winter squash!

by Becca Camacho

Autumn is truly here and that means a variety of winter squash are available at the market.  Due to their thick skins protecting the flesh, winter squash have a long shelf life so they can serve as pretty decorations then be turned into a delightful dish a few weeks later.  And, if you’re looking to continue to serve your family vegetables from the market long after the outdoor market season closes, you can store the squash in a cool place such as a basement storage and they will likely stay good for 1-2 months. Common varieties that you may see at the Fulton Market are Acorn, Delicata, Kabocha, Spaghetti, Butternut, and Sugar Pie Pumpkins just to name a few.  

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Winter squashes are a great source of iron, vitamins A and C, riboflavins and antioxidants that are good for us.  These winter delights are also a friendly food to many kinds because of their naturally sweet and nutty flavor.  Common flavors/ingredients that pair well with squash include garlic, sage, spices like ginger or cinnamon, cream, nuts, onions, maple syrup, cheeses, and greens, just to name a few.  We’ve pulled together a few of our favorite recipes using some of the more common winter squash varieties at the market as well as the best ways to roast butternut squash, a market favorite.  

Here’s a handy guide from the NYC Greenmarkets on identifying common winter squash varieties:

By Claudia Pearson.  From www.grownyc.org

By Claudia Pearson. From www.grownyc.org

Roasting Butternut Squash

There are two simple methods to roasting a butternut squash and the key to doing it safely and easily are in the tools.  The first way includes a good, sharp chef’s knife because it requires you to cut through the thick skin and cut the vegetable right down the middle.  If your knife is dull, you stand a greater risk of the knife slipping.  Place the squash on a board and carefully insert the tip of the blade into the middle of the squash so that your knife runs parallel with the length of the squash and you will be slicing through the bottom end.  Once the tip of the blade is in an inch or so, you can then push down on the knife so that you’ve cut all the way through the squash on the bottom end.  Then, turn your squash around and do the same for the top end.  Once you’ve halved the squash, scoop out the innards and the seeds and discard.  Then, just rub the flesh of your squash with olive oil, salt and pepper and roast, flesh side up in an oven for about 45 minutes at 400 degrees.  It is done when you can put a knife in it easily.

The second way to roast a butter requires a Y peeler, which is a tool that looks like a Y but has a sharp peeling blade in between it.  Using the Y peeler, start at the top of the squash and peel the skin away.  This is much easier than using other peelers, but you will still need to put a little muscle into it!  Once the skin is off, halve it and remove the innards and seeds and then cut into any shape you want.  You can do large crescents, large cubes, or small cubes.  Toss the cut up pieces of squash with salt and pepper and roast at 400 for about 40 minutes for larger pieces 25 minutes for a smaller cube.

Quick ideas for dressing up your roasted squash:

  • Before roasting, drizzle with maple syrup for a sweet, almost candied flavor.

  • Rub the flesh of a halved squash with a crushed garlic clove before adding the olive oil, then top with chopped sage.  When it is roasted, you could add cooked and crumbled pancetta or bacon.

  • Add chopped thyme and orange juice to your olive oil before roasting.

  • Combine a half a teaspoon of adobo sauce/chipotle sauce to the olive oil and brush the flesh.  This will give you a smoky and spicy side dish.  

  • To your olive oil add ½ tsp garam masala, ¼ tsp cinnamon, ½ tsp salt, ½ tsp tumeric and ½ tsp curry for an Eastern flavor.

  • Top arugula dressed in a simple dressing of apple cider vinegar and olive oil with roasted butternut squash cubes and cut up grilled or braised garlic lamb brats from Star Thrower Farm for a satisfying but very simple meal.

Acorn Squash

This is a smaller squash with the shape of it’s namesake.  It’s nutty flavor is attractive and it is easy to handle.

This Warm Kale Salad with Maple Roasted Acorn Squash allows you to pick up most of your ingredients at the market.  Grab some kale, maple syrup and your winter squash and head back to your kitchen!  http://jellytoastblog.com/2013/09/warm-kale-salad-maple-roasted-acorn-squash.html/

Combine acorn squash with another Minnesota favorite, wild rice, for a stuffed version.  This recipe is deceptively easy and filling enough to serve as a meal by itself.  Or, pair it with a simple salad for guests.  And, if you have heartier eaters, it would be nice roasted chicken thighs or tender slices of pork tenderloin.  
http://www.chow.com/recipes/13566-roasted-acorn-squash-with-wild-rice-stuffing

Butternut Squash

We did highlight how to roast this squash, but there are other methods of enjoying this pretty orange vegetable.

Butternut Squash and Leek Soup
Food & Wine 1989, serves 8

4 ½ pounds butternut squash, halved lengthwise
5 tbs unsalted butter
4 large leeks (white and tender green), chopped
5 cups chicken stock
1 ¼ tsp salt
½ tsp freshly ground pepper
½ c sour cream
3 tbs chopped chives
8 slices of bacon, fried crisp and crumbled.

Preheat the oven to 350.  Place the squash, cut-side down, on a baking sheet and bake until tender, about 40 minutes.  Let cool slightly.  Using a spoon, scoop out and discard the seeds.  Scrape the squash from the skin.

Meanwhile, in a large/heavy saucepan, melt the butter over low heat.  Add the leeks and thyme and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened and lightly browned, about 40 minutes.  Discard the thyme sprigs.

Stir in the stock and the squash.  Simmer the soup over moderate heat for 20 minutes.

In a blender or food processor, puree the soup in batches until smooth.  Pour the soup back into the pan and season with the salt and pepper.  (The recipe can be prepared to this point up to 2 days ahead.  Reheat before proceeding.)

To serve, ladle the soup into bowls and garnish each serving with 1 tablespoon sour cream, 1 teaspoon chopped chives and a sprinkling of the crumbled bacon.  (**We suggest substituting the bacon for cooked and crumbled chorizo to make it spicy!)

Butternut Squash Risotto

Blue cheese pairs beautifully with butternut squash in this risotto recipe.  Try topping it with chopped walnuts. http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Butternut-Squash-Rosemary-and-Blue-Cheese-Risotto-231601

Kabocha

This Asian variety is green and has the shape of a pumpkin, which is why it is also often known as a Japanese pumpkin.  Spice up your plate this winter with one of these recipes.

This red curry kabocha dish is an easy weeknight vegetarian meal. Clean up is a cinch as it uses only one pot.  You could add tofu or shrimp if your family requires a heartier dish.  http://www.chow.com/recipes/30268-thai-red-curry-with-kabocha-squash

Thai Curry Coconut Bisque recipe is creamy and delicious.  Impress guests by adding a scoop of fresh crab meat to the center of the bowl just before serving. http://seattletimes.com/html/foodwine/2004081133_recipesquash19.html

Spaghetti Squash

This is a really fun squash that, when cooked, give you noodles similar to spaghetti or angel hair pasta, thus it makes a great substitution to actual pasta for those watching their carbs.  The flavor is the squash is very mild so we recommend pairing it with a sauce.  

To make your spaghetti squash simply prick it all over with a metal fork.  Then put it in a dish and bake it, whole, in the oven at 375 degrees for about an hour.  By pricking it, you’re allowing it to vent and let some air out while so that it doesn’t explode in your oven.  Then, when it is cool enough for your to handle, cut it down the middle and remove the seeds and innards.  Finally, take a fork and scrape it lengthwise along each half and this will free up the strands, giving you your noodles.  Try one of the sauces below as a topping!

Sage Brown Butter Sauce
Makes 4-6 servings or tops one spaghetti squash

1 stick unsalted butter (8 tablespoons)
15 fresh sage leaves, rough chopped
⅓ c chicken broth

Melt the butter in a medium frying pan over medium heat.  You will see it froth and develop a milky texture.  Once that texture has browned, about 4-5 minutes, add the sage and the broth and reduce to a simmer.  Continue to simmer until it thickens slightly, just a few minutes.  Season with salt and freshly ground pepper and serve.

Creamy Mushroom Sauce
Makes 4 -6 servings or tops one spaghetti squash

2 tbs olive oil
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 large shallot, sliced thinly
1 pound fresh mushrooms, such as crimini, oyster, or hen of the woods (have market vendor Mississippi Mushrooms help you choose a mix!)
¼ c white wine
½ c vegetable or chicken broth
¼ c half & half
¼ c cream cheese, cut into small chunks
¼ c chopped fresh parsley
½ c shredded parmesan or parmesan-reggiano

Heat the olive oil in a skillet then add the garlic, shallot, and the mushrooms.  Cook 3-5 minutes on medium-high heat until soft, taking care not to burn your garlic.  Deglaze your pan with the white wine then add in the broth and the half &  half and stir.  Once the broth and cream are warmed through add the cream cheese and stir until it has melted into the sauce.  Finally, add in the parsley and let cook about 30 seconds.  Ladle this sauce over your spaghetti squash and top with the parmesan.  

***This sauce is also fantastic over fresh noodles from Broder’s and would be great over a variety of the proteins you can buy at the market like Wild Run Salmon or Auntie Annie’s Chicken.

Pie Pumpkin

They’re not just for carving, pumpkin is a fantastic ingredient for using in both desserts as well as main dishes.  

Martha Stewart gives us this recipe for a pumpkin and pecorino gratin.  http://www.marthastewart.com/337163/pumpkin-and-pecorino-gratin?czone=food%2Fproduce-guide-cnt%2Fproduce-guide-fall&gallery=274288&slide=337163&center=276955

The NY Times shows us how to make pumpkin pie using real pumpkins versus your canned version.  Give it a try this Thanksgiving! http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/14/how-to-make-fresh-pumpkin-pie/

Have seeds from your pumpkins and don’t want to make plain baked salt and pepper seeds?  Try this sweet and spicy recipe for your pumpkin seeds, featuring garam masala and pumpkin pie spice.  http://mamaguru.com/sweet-and-spiced-roasted-pumpkin-seeds/

Veggie of the week: Root Veggies!

Carrots, turnips, rutabagas, parsnips, potatoes and more!  Root vegetables are fantastic for you.  They are high in fiber, phytonutrients, vitamin C, beta-carotenes and anti-oxidants.  They are also beautiful.  Rutabagas, while funny-looking on the outside, are a pretty soft orange that glistens when roasted.  Parsnips are creamy white, carrots the obvious bright orange and discover the buttery yellow inside a Yukon gold potato.  Most root vegetables can be made into a savory or a sweet dish, making them versatile as well as delicious.  Besides being healthy, pretty, and flavorful; root vegetables are a snap to prepare into tasty dishes in the kitchen.  Below are some of our favorite tips and tricks.

L to R: parsnips, rutabaga, beets, and turnips

A collection of parsnips, rutabaga, beets, and turnips

 

Roasting

This method of cooking your root vegetables draws out the sugary flavor that makes you compulsively eat them like potato chips. We recommend combining various vegetables such as rutabagas, parsnips and beets to make a pretty dish.  

To roast your root veggies, cut into similar-sized shapes such as crescents or sticks that are about 2 inches wide and 4 inches long.  Toss with olive oil, kosher salt and freshly ground pepper.  Lay the veggies on a sheet pan that has been covered in parchment paper and roast at 400 degrees for about 35-45 minutes until starting to caramelize by turning brown.  The more that you caramelize your vegetables, the more that they will taste almost candy-like.  If you cut your vegetables smaller, like cubes, you will reduce your cooking time.

Try adding any or all of the following in with your vegetables when roasting:  shallots, halved brussel sprouts, garlic, fennel or chestnuts.  And any of these herbs would be great to chop and add to the sheet pan:  sage, rosemary, thyme (our favorite), or chervil.  

If you feel like dressing up your roasted roots, try one of these tips:

  • Honey Glazed veggies:  For 5 pounds of vegetables, add a ½ cup of honey to warmed olive oil before tossing and placing on the pan.  Sprinkle with chopped thyme.  (You could also add 3 tablespoons of mustard for Honey Mustard Glazed veggies.)

  • Root Vegetables with Balsamic Syrup:  Put a cup of balsamic syrup in a reduction pan.  Using a cheesecloth and twine, create a bouquet garni with 5 peppercorns and 3 rosemary sprigs.  Bring to a boil and simmer about 20 minutes until thick and syrupy.  Discard the bouquet garni and drizzle your balsamic syrup over your roasted vegetables.  

  • Add the zest and juice of half an orange and sage to your olive oil before roasting the vegetables to make a savory citrus version.

  • Create an autumnal salad by tossing arugula with olive oil and a small amount of apple cider vinegar.  On a platter, lay your arugula down, then your roasted vegetables (if you cubed your veggies, this would be a good way to use them).  Then, take some of Singing Hills Dairy’s fresh chevre and, using your fingers, break it up and sprinkle on top.  Finally, finish the dish with rough chopped pistachios.  You may want to keep this idea in your back pocket for Thanksgiving next month!

Slow-Cooker Soups and Stews

For some busy parents, the slow-cooker or crockpot, is their best friend.  It allows them to make dinner for their family in advance and come home to an aromatic house.  Try one of these flavorful recipes for easy weeknight meals.

Root Vegetable Puree

Roasting may be our favorite method, but a puree is equally delicious.  And, if you’re having company, a lovely orange puree of root vegetables is sure to impress any guest.  Try this recipe from Epicurious:  http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Autumn-Root-Vegetable-Puree-231140#

Once you’ve mastered the puree, you may be looking for different menu ideas with which to serve it.  Put it on your table along with any of the following:

  • Top the puree with crispy thyme roasted chicken thighs and wilted spinach.

  • Place quickly seared lamb chops from Star Thrower Farm on the puree and drizzle the whole dish with the rosemary balsamic syrup we mentioned above.

  • Poach salmon in a combination of equal parts orange juice, white wine and water, along with a few thyme sprigs.  This method gives the fish a very juicy texture and an alluring citrus flavor – perfect with the puree.

  • Use leftover puree, along with other fridge finds to make a wrap.  Take a whole wheat or honey wheat tortilla or flatbread and spread warmed puree and leftover chicken or beef, wilted spinach, dried craisins and bleu cheese and roll it up.  You have a sweet and savory wrap!

“Veggie” of the week: Apples!

by Becca Camacho

If tomatoes are the jewels of the summer market then apples are surely the darlings of an autumn farmers market.  Whether they be Haralson, Honeycrisp, Zestar!, McIntosh or another variety, kids and adults alike are excited to enjoy them.  They’re perfect raw, in cider on Saturday morning, and in the form of an apple cider donut from Sweetland Orchard  (Note to people who love donuts, get to the market early!).  Below are a few fresh ideas for how to use your peck or bushel of apples.

IMG_3052

Sauce your apples!

Homemade applesauce is delicious.  Absolutely delicious.  This version is chunky, sweet and it just feels good to eat it!  Your kids will devour it so we’ve given a recipe that makes quite a bit.  If you can stand to not eat it right out of the container then consider using it as a sauce for pork chops, a topping for ice cream, substitute your jam for a pb&a sandwich, or top a fresh bagel and cream cheese with it.  Try this and you’ll be back at the market the following week asking for more apples!

Applesauce by Susie Camacho

8 pounds of apples such as Cortland or McIntosh (not too sweet and not too tart)
1 c brown sugar
2 tsp cinnamon
2 tsp salt

Peel and core the apples.  Then, cut them into chunks and place them in a Dutch oven.  Add 2 inches of water to the pan and bring to a simmer.  Once it is to simmering, turn down the heat, add a lid and cook slowly until very soft.  Maybe 30-45 minutes.  When done, taste an apple, if it needs to be sweeter add a little bit of white sugar and stir.  Finally, mash with a potato masher or pastry blender until chunky.  If you like it smoother then use an immersion blender.

***If you have a food mill, skip the peeling of the apples and when they are soft, run them through the food mill.  This also gives you the benefit of a nice pink color.

Salads

Apples are, of course, delicious in salads.  Here are a few combinations you could do and one recipe for you to try using kale (also available at our market by several vendors!).

  • Apples, candied pecans or walnuts, blue cheese and romaine with a mustard and white balsamic vinaigrette

  • Apples, cheddar cheese, almonds or chopped walnuts and spinach with a mustard vinaigrette

  • Apples, candied walnuts, blue cheese, fresh endive and a balsamic vinaigrette

  • Apples, celery, feta, arugula and a curry vinaigrette

Kale and Apple Salad by Food Network
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/kale-and-apple-salad-recipe/index.html

Soup

Squash is also available at the market.  Try this Butternut Squash and Apple Soup from Ina Garten.  http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/butternut-squash-and-apple-soup-recipe/index.html

Do you have leftover celery?  Use it up in this Celery and Apple Soup from the blog Daily Unadventures in Cooking.  The texture is great and the ginger adds a nice flavor.  http://www.dailyunadventuresincooking.com/recipe/celery-and-apple-soup-recipe/

Easy Weeknight Meal

Fall is a busy season!  Kids are back at school, work may have picked up, and we have less time on our hands.  But we still want delicious food.  This is a fantastically easy one-skillet dish that will warm your family on a chilly night.  Plus, it’s impressive enough for guests!

Pork Tenderloin with Apples by Martha Stewart
http://www.marthastewart.com/342129/pork-tenderloin-and-apples

 

Baking

And, of course, we all love baked apples.  Sweet and delicious!  Here are a few recipes to try.

Apple Crisp by Becca Camacho
6-8 servings

4 medium tart cooking apples, sliced
1 cup brown sugar
1 cup all purpose flour
1 stick unsalted butter, cut in half then cut crosswise so that you have about 10 pieces of butter
1 cup pecan halves, roughly chopped so they are in large chunks

Butter the bottoms and sides of an 8 inch square pan.  Place the apples in the pan and spread them out.  

In a bowl add the sugar and flour and stir, then add the butter and, using your fingers, rub the mixture so the flour combines with the butter.  Finally, add in the pecans and mix together.  Place this topping over the apples and bake at 375 for about 30 minutes.  Enjoy!

Baked Apples

Paula Deen may be controversial right now, but the Southern lady knows her desserts!  Try these baked apples.  http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/baked-apples-recipe/index.html

 

Want an impressive cobbler for guests?  A vintage recipe from 1989 still knows how to impress with a combination of apples and prunes that create a slight tartness with a thick and buttery crust.

Apple and Prune Cobbler with Buttermilk Biscuit Crust by Food & Wine
8 to 10 servings

2 pounds firm cooking apples, such as Northern Spy
1 cup pitted prunes (about 8 ounces)
½ cup walnut pieces, coarsely chopped
½ cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar
½ teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
Buttermilk Biscuit Dough (recipe follows)
1 tablespoon milk or buttermilk

Peel, halve and core the apples.  Slice each half into 5 to 6 wedges, from stem to blossom end.  Slice each prune into 3 or 4 strips.  In a large bowl combine the apples, prunes and chopped walnuts.

Preheat the oven to 375.  In a bowl, combine ½ cup of the sugar, the cinnamon and the flour.  Toss with the fruit and nut mixture.  Pour the filling into a 1 ½ quart shallow baking dish, sprinkle on the lemon juice and dot with the butter.

On a lightly floured surface, roll the Buttermilk Biscuit Dough a little less than ¼ inch thick, slightly larger than the baking dish.  Transfer the dough to the top of the filling and trim any overhang even with the rim of the dish.  Flute the edge of the dough at the rim.  Slash 4 or 5 vent holes about 1 inch long in the center of the crust.  Pain the dough with the milk and sprinkle with the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar.

Bake the cobbler for 30 minutes, or until the dough is baked through and deep golden and the filing is beginning to bubble.  Let the cobbler cool on a rack.  Serve warm or at room temperature.  

Buttermilk Biscuit Dough

This is a soft dough.  Use a tart pan bottom or thin flexible cookie sheet to transfer it to the top of the filling.  

¾ cup unbleached all-purpose flour
¾ cup cake flour
1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons cold unsalted butter
¾ cup buttermilk or milk

Combine the flours, baking powder and salt.  Sift into a mixing bowl.

Cut the butter into 8 or 10 pieces and add to the dry ingredients.  Rub the butter in with your fingertips until the mixture resembles coarse meal.

Make a well in the center and add the buttermilk.  Toss with a fork to moisten evenly.  Let the dough stand in the bowl for 1 minute to absorb the liquid.  Turn out onto a floured work surface.  Fold the dough over on itself 2 or 3 times until it is smooth and less sticky.

Veggie of the week: Beets!

by Becca Camacho

Who doesn’t love beautiful food?  We all do.  There is a good amount of money  spent in the restaurant industry and we pay chefs compliments by oohing and aahing when our specially plated meals arrive at our tables.  Don’t you wish you could do it at home?  You can!  Start with a glamorously pink vegetable like a beet and you’ll soon be giving yourself accolades!

Most beets are delightfully pink but there are varieties such as Chioggias that are pink and white striped.  Almost like a peppermint candy.  A Golden beet is just like its name, golden like the sun and a Yellow Detroit tricks you by being orange when it’s raw but softening to a yellow when cooked.   A beet is a friendly vegetable because you can eat both the bulb as well as the greens which only require a simple sautee.  And, they’re very easy to cook.

IMG_3008

In general, there are 3 ways to cook a beet bulb.  You can steam them, roast them or boil them.  All of these ways include removing the dirty outer skin.  We find that the easiest – and least messiest – way is to roast them.  But, regardless of how you decide to cook your beet, the result is an earthy and pretty product that pairs well with spicy greens, soft cheeses, vinegars, citrus and nuts.  Read on for some tips on how to serve your beets.

Roasting Beets

As mentioned above, there are a few ways to cook your beet, but the easiest (in our opinion) and most fun (also in our opinion) way to cook them is to roast them.  Here’s how. Remove the greens and scrub your beets and grab a tube of aluminum foil.  You’re going to put each beet in a square of the foil.  If you have small beets, you can put them together.  Set the beets in a square of oil, drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle generously with salt and pepper and then close up the foil so the beet is completely encased.  Set all of these onto a pan and put in a 450 degree for about an hour until the beets are slightly soft.  When they are cool enough to be touched, you simply unwrap the beets from their foil and rub the beets with the foil until the skins come off.  Of course, if you’ve had a recent manicure or don’t want your hands to turn pink you may want to consider wearing a pair of kitchen gloves.  Either dress your beets with a vinaigrette, oranges, walnuts and Singing Hills Dairy goat cheese or use in these recipes below.  We have featured recipes for how to use a beet for each course of a meal.  As you can see, this is a very versatile vegetable!

Starter

Serve this pretty dip for a football party or a Thanksgiving appetizer.  http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/creamy-beet-dip-with-white-crudites

This goat cheese crostini is delicious and pretty.  Perfect for a girls’ get together. http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/beet-goat-cheese-crostini-10000000424539/

Soup

A classic Ukranian borscht.  Adapted from Yuliya Pokhodnya

2 pieces of beef meat on a bone – you can use a cheap scrap bone from the butcher  

4 quart stock pot, 3 quarts full of water

8 peppercorns

2 bay leaves

1 yellow onion, halved

2 parsnips, cut into chunks

1 tbs salt
3 carrots, diced or julienned

2-3 med beets, diced or julienned

1 small baking potato, peeled and diced
¼ savoy cabbage, shredded

1.5 c lima beans
2 minced cloves of garlic, additional salt and pepper.

Put the bone through the salt into the water and bring to a boil then simmer for an hour, skim for fat in the beginning.  When the stock is rich in flavor, take out the onion, bay leaf and parsnip and pepper.

In a separate pan, add the olive oil and heat then add the carrots, beets and potato.  Once the vegetables are starting to tender add a little bit of stock  until the vegetables are al dente. 

Add the carrot mixture to the stockpot and let it cook for 5 minutes then add the tomato paste and let it dissolve.   Then, add the cabbage and lima beans until the cabbage is wilted.  Finally, add the garlic.  Turn off the pot and let it sit 20 minutes.  Then taste the soup and season with additional salt and pepper as necessary.

Garnish with sour cream or crème fraiche.  Chopped tarragon would be pretty too.

Salad

This beet green tossed salad is substantial.  It could be served as a main course for lunch or with a chicken breast or halibut steak for dinner.  http://www.sproutedkitchen.com/home/2012/3/20/beet-green-chopped-salad.html

This is an amazing salad.  It is perfect for company and easy enough for a simple family meal.  All the components are delicious so if you haven’t the time, just prepare what you can and you’ll still have a delightful salad.  http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/roasted-beets-with-pistachios-herbs-and-orange

Main

Beets?  Pasta?  Ricotta?  Yes please!  This is a pretty presentation – you won’t even know it’s healthy!  http://www.wholeliving.com/157177/beet-pasta-ricotta

A one dish recipe.  Chicken and beets and greens.  Try Auntie Annie’s chicken with this dish.  http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Chicken-Grated-Beets-and-Beet-Greens-with-Orange-Butter-355772

Dessert

Beets make cakes especially moist, try Martha Stewart’s recipe featured here.  http://www.delish.com/recipefinder/chocolate-beet-cake-recipe-mslo0113